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COLLEGE GRAD WHO USES A WHEELCHAIR MAKES MARK ON THE FASHION INDUSTRY 

Kent State grad Kaycee Marshall was born with serious medical conditions, but never stopped dreaming big. An aspiring fashion designer, she now creates stylish adaptive clothing for disabled women. Marshall and proud mom Penny share her story on TODAY.

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ADAPTIVE FASHION WEBINAR SERIES: LEARNING FROM THE INNOVATORS

To conclude the Adaptive Fashion Series in partnership with Runway of Dreams and Gamut Management, CFDA hosted a webinar which brought together a group of innovators with disabilities and innovators working with people with disabilities who shared how they solve a problem and create products or concepts to help “navigate” a world that was not designed for them.

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KAYCEE MARSHALL ON WHY INCLUSIVE DESIGN IS THE FUTURE OF FASHION

Tens of millions of adults and children in the U.S. live with a disability. Yet, when it comes to accessible fashion, maybe labels are still lagging behind. Which is where Juniper Unlimited comes in. The e-comm site and content hub is all about inclusivity, with dozens of brands tailor-made for easier access and function-meets-fashion design. Below, Kaycee Marshall, a designer at Yarrow (one of the labels available at Juniper Unlimited), explains why inclusive design is personal for her as a wheelchair user, and why it’s also a big part of the future of fashion.

Tell us about your work at Yarrow as a designer.
“In 2016, I lost my Grandma Emily to Parkinson’s, and she was an amazing influence on my life. I will forever be thankful for all the days she was there to get me off the school bus, the many summers I got to spend with her, and how she would sit me up on the countertop so I could help her cook. She was such a constant throughout my childhood, at every school program, play, and dance recital. I miss her everyday, but I am proud to be able to honor her in my work with Yarrow. It was hard to watch my stylish grandma lose the ability to wear the clothing she wanted. Yarrow is designed with her needs in mind which makes getting dressed simpler. I hope that Yarrow can make another woman’s journey with Parkinson’s easier by restoring dignity and empowering her to go about her day in ease.”

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FORMER RILEY PATIENT CREATES FASHION SHOW FUNDRAISER 

Kaycee Marshall, a fashion design senior at Kent State University, says she owes a debt of gratitude to Riley Hospital for Children. She has had nine surgeries at the hospital since being born with a spine that wasn’t fully formed.

Marshall and Savanna Harrison, also a Riley Kid and nursing student at University of Southern Indiana,  are co-hosting the second annual fashion show to benefit Riley Hospital.

Cirque Des Rêves, or Circus of Dreams, is much larger this year. This year’s circus theme will be represented by various outfits, such as a strong man and a ringleader. Brianna Caprice will sing as the evening’s entertainment.